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Where To Go For Support When It’s Needed

by Coaching Out of the Box

No matter what the workload is like as a coach, there is likely a time when every coach will need some support. It is crucial to have the proper support system in place so as to keep sane. How to set up this support system depends on the coach themselves. There are options for online groups, close friends, other coaches in the community, the options go on. The scenario for why support is required can also determine where a coach should go. The following are some guidelines for finding support when it’s needed:

 

  1. Where to Start? What is the reason support is required? Is it a personal issue or a business issue? Different situations require different ways of approaching the issues and can produce different results. Good coaches work with the whole person and can support you in coming up with a plan, strategy, provide resources or key next steps.

     

  2. Find a coach for the coach. Just because someone is a coach already, it doesn’t mean they won’t need a coach of their own to help them. A lot of times people have trouble seeing the situation from any other vantage point, even if that might be their job with others.

  3. Commit to always learning more. Every coach should still be in the process of learning, whether they take additional courses or read books, they have never fully learned everything and might find some solutions in new learning materials.

  4. Join online groups to engage in discussions and ask questions. These groups often have a variety of people in different aspects of coaching and at different levels in their careers. Whatever the situation is, there is likely someone available who has been through it and can provide feedback on their experiences.

  5. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness. In fact, studies have shown there is a higher level of respect that can be gained by admitting to not knowing all the answers.

  6. Sometimes the support needed might be in taking a step back. Becoming overwhelmed and stressed can lead to a clouded mind and some problems may seem larger than they are in these situations. Take a step back and regroup for a better perspective.

No matter what the course of action is, getting support when it is necessary is a vital part of life, no matter what the career path. Never be afraid to reach out to others or to provide support for peers and friends. People are stronger when they trust that others will support them.

Coaching Out of the Box® has several courses available this fall. See our calendar of events or sign up for our newsletter to learn more.

Want to learn how we can bring leadership skills to your business or organization? Contact us directly to discuss the options available for you.

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How To Work Around A Client with Irrational Beliefs

by Coaching Out of the Box

In the coaching world, one might come across a client who has what may be referred to as “irrational beliefs”, which have various definitions but for the sake of this article, we will refer to them as limiting beliefs about life, abilities, attitudes, opinions and values that do not align with how things actually are. For instance, the University of Birmingham notes four types of irrational beliefs, however, they mostly stem from “Demand”, which often features language such as “must”, “absolute”, “have to”, etc. For instance, a client may express that if they are unable to achieve a dream or goal, they will be a failure – this is also referred to as “awfulizing”.

Although it can be tough to get a client through these beliefs, there are some steps that may help:

  1. Clients with strong beliefs associating outcomes to self-worth may not be immediately able to see how these types of thoughts will limit them. Try to get the client to understand the realistic outcomes of a failed situation, which may help them visualize life beyond the setback.
  2. Use logic and reasoning as much as possible when addressing these beliefs since they are most likely illogical in nature. For instance, a client who may feel terrible, wouldn’t necessarily think they are terrible. The same logic may translate into failure in action vs. failure in self.
  3. Dispute certain beliefs with empirical evidence. Challenge the client to prove their beliefs are in fact realistic. Occasionally this might enlighten the client or at least begin the process to having them see things differently.
  4. Use a scale to have the client identify where they perceive they land. For instance, if they feel they are not competent, have them provide their competency on a scale of 1-100%. Use this number as a starting point for discussion on recent events that might disprove this belief. This number may also prove useful to measure the client’s progress by asking the same scale in future sessions.
  5. Implement small changes in a positive direction. These small changes may impact greater outcomes for multiple situations (since clients likely use the same solutions they always have for each problem – if they have a slightly different solution, they will see different results). Once the client starts to see the results, they may reconsider their previous beliefs.

Irrational beliefs can be built up over a lifetime of perceiving situations in the wrong light. Undoing this may take some time and persistence, but it is possible and once the client has opened up to new possibilities past these limiters, the results will speak for themselves.

Coaching Out of The Box has several courses available this fall. See our calendar of events or sign up for our newsletter to learn more.

Want to learn how we can bring leadership skills to your business or organization? Contact us directly to discuss the options available for you.

You can also connect with us via email: info@coachingoutofthebox.com, or at any of our social media sites:

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How to Set Boundaries with Clients

by Coaching Out of the Box

Boundaries are an essential part of a healthy relationship with any client. This is especially true in a situation where personal details are being shared and trust is being built. Sometimes in an effort to appease, a coach will allow certain actions or behaviors to go on without stopping them for fear of upsetting or even losing a client. Unfortunately this sets a precedent and can lead to issues further down the road. Here are some ways to learn how to set boundaries with clients:

  1. Know what limits are important before starting out with clients. It is hard to set boundaries with someone else when they aren’t clear personally. Identify comfortable physical, mental, emotional and spiritual limits as the coach.
  2. Do not allow the client to take advantage of time. Starting late or staying late are only options in extremes, not given alternatives to their schedules.
  3. Communicate effectively and be direct. Some clients will naturally have similar communication styles and understand without specific dialogue to guide them, others will not. Learn the difference and have appropriate conversations early on to establish boundaries.
  4. Be assertive, especially if control is being lost or clients are stepping over set boundaries. Occasionally people are unaware, but sometimes they just need a firm reminder of their behaviours.
  5. Learn to say no and mean it. This can be a difficult skill for some, but absolutely essential, even outside of coaching a client. Make sure to say no to activities that may take up too much time or energy and cause the business to suffer.
  6. Set expectations, especially in communications with clients. Make a signature or footer that identifies working times and when clients might expect responses (ie. within 4 business hours or next business day).
  7. Do not feel guilty with set boundaries or decisions. Some clients may use manipulation or guilt to change a boundary they don’t particularly like, but this should never be allowed to happen. Those clients may also be better served by someone else if this behaviour continues.

Setting boundaries should never be considered a bad thing or inhibit a coaching relationship, in fact, it should establish the coach as a respectable leader. It keeps the relationship in check and can help build trust, setting the client up for a greater potential future outcome.

Read what participants are saying about our coaching skills courses

This program exceeded my expectations! I walked away with a toolbox of coaching strategies and personally made changes and grew in my own life. It was excellent.

- Karen Rutherford, Manager Goodwill Industries
on Personal Groundwork for Coaching Program™

Coaching Fundamentals was essential to my growth as a human resources professional. I feel like I have the tools I need to have powerful conversations with the people I work with.

- Anonymous
on Coaching Fundamentals Program™

 

Coaching Out of the Box has several courses available this fall. See our calendar of events or sign up for our newsletter to learn more.

Want to learn how we can bring leadership skills to your business or organization? Contact us directly to discuss the options available for you.

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What Will It Take To Believe In Your Coachee?

by Coaching Out of the Box

In order to be successful at coaching a client, a coach must be able to connect with them. This takes a decisive strategy to really get to the right questions and delve into who the client is. It also takes believing in the client and knowing that they are an intelligent being, capable of finding the answers they are looking for, but they just need a little help to get there. A coach must believe in their own abilities as well as those of their clients. Here are some keys to building up that connection with the client that allow a coach to believe in the client’s ability to solve their problem:

  1. Listen intently to what the client is saying. Put the focus on them and believe what they are saying to be their truth in the situation. Do not inject personal judgments or beliefs into their story.
  2. Don’t get distracted. Thoughts, future responses, additional questions, to-do lists, even daydreams can get in the way of actually listening to a client. Their words may be heard, but listening is more than just hearing. Absorbing the information and cataloguing it is also important.
  3. Ask the right questions. This can be tricky depending on the person and their ability to discuss personal information, but really getting to know them will assist in the ability to help them.
  4. Dig deeper than just the surface. Sometimes coaches have a question bias or they fail to dig deeper to the underlying issues that might trigger the required responses in the client. Perhaps the client is not even aware those causes exist and asking evocative questions helps them discover new things about themselves and their behaviours.
  5. Don’t feel the need to be the expert in the client’s situation. The coach is the expert in coaching but the client is the expert in their life and situation.
  6. Provide feedback. Do this without judgment or leading the client in a direction they may not be headed organically.

A client who feels their coach believes in them is a client who is more likely to open up about their situation and allow their coach to really dig in. Ultimately, the client is the one in charge of the decisions and having someone believe in their ability to make the right decisions can make a world of difference.

Coaching Out of The Box has several courses available this fall. See our calendar of events or sign up for our newsletter to learn more.

Want to learn how we can bring leadership skills to your business or organization? Contact us directly to discuss the options available for you.

You can also connect with us via email: info@coachingoutofthebox.com, or at any of our social media sites:

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What is Required to Bring Out The Best In Others?

by Coaching Out of the Box

Leaders are tasked with many objectives, but one of the biggest is to bring out the best in their team. This may seem like a daunting task to some, but there are key habits to form which may help bring about a team’s best results. The following are the basics to help a leader learn to bring out the best in others:

  • Learn not to micromanage. Believe in the team’s abilities to do what they are supposed to do and trust them to complete their tasks.
  • Create a safe environment for open dialogue. Give permission for team members to speak their mind and opinions without judgment. Build the trust within the team so everyone feels included in discussions.
  • Focus on each team member’s strengths and encourage them to grow. This not only helps them to see their own worth but allows them to feel valuable to the team effort.
  • Listen to concerns and empathize with others. This can help with reducing any stress or tension that person or persons may have.
  • Recognize good performance individually and as a team. Often a small reward for a job well done can help motivate.
  • Provide feedback in a positive way and let the person know their contributions are valued.
  • Encourage team members, especially when challenges arise. Supporting someone during challenging times may make a difference in their outcomes.

When each member of the team is doing their best, the outcome of their work will be productive. This will reflect positively on the team and the leader.

Coaching Out of The Box has several courses available this fall. See our calendar of events or sign up for our newsletter to learn more.

Want to learn how we can bring leadership skills to your business or organization? Contact us directly to discuss the options available for you.

You can also connect with us via email: info@coachingoutofthebox.com, or at any of our social media sites:

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